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Combining Disciplines: Art by Adrian Molina

A sculpture made of an object with strands of dried paint attached in three dimensionsDescarga

Adrian Molina lists his works as “sculptural paintings” and “painterly sculptures” – and the artist certainly enjoys combining disciplines in his work. Adrian attacks his works from a philosophical, and even scientific standpoint.


A screen capture of the "sculptural paintings" gallery on Adrian Molina's websiteAdrian's Sculptural Paintings gallery on his art webpage

A painting of a man thinking, with the thought bubble made three dimensionalConsider Not Becoming

True, his sculptures are about as painterly as possible without being actual paintings. It looks as though the artist has used thick strings of paint, dried into three-dimensional forms, and arranged them in such compositions that from a straight angle, and on a black or white background, they do indeed look like modern abstract paintings. Similarly, Adrian’s paintings use multiple surfaces, or paint layered on so thick that it becomes structural, to break free of the flat plane of the canvas.


I’m also a big fan of Adrian’s Works in Motion – which are small stop-motion animation that he’s produced by taking multiple photos of sculptural works, giving them the appearance of strange machines or robots. 


A sculpture with a handheld sander on one end and a spiral of dried paint reach backwardColour of Sound I

About the author

Dallas Jeffs Art Writer

Dallas Jeffs is the Editor of Artist Run Website's blog. She is a recent graduate of Emily Carr University of Art and Design, where she studied Critical and Cultural Practices. She is passionate about talking and writing about art, and sharing that interest with others. In her studio practice she is a painter, but she considers herself an art writer and educator foremost. If you like art, books and culture with a science fiction twist, check out Dallas' personal blog, HappySpaceNoises

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