Blog Menu

Dark Symbolism and Morbid Humour: Art by Andra Ursuta

An installation view of Andra Usruta's WhitesWhites, installation view

Andra Ursuta was born in Romania but moved to New York to study in 1997. Her works of sculptural installation are rife with dark symbolism and morbid humour.  


Ursuta often derives the conceptual basis for her works from headlines and photos found on the internet. As such, the subject matter of her work is often slightly dark – with terrorist plots, domestic violence and other violent crimes often coming to the forefront. Rather than shying away from the subject matter, Urusta treats her work as a form of mourning, creating monolithic, tactile sculptures that have an almost human presence.   


An installation sculpted in the shape of a strange cathedral or buildingOrthodoctrinator, urethan plastic, urethane foam, wood, iron oxide, pigments, hairdryers

Stylistically, Ursuta’s works have been compared to those of Constantin Brancusi and Yves Klein. I really enjoy her most recent show, consisting of a number of large, pale stone shapes sitting on the types of chairs one might find in schools and community centers.  It’s an absurd, half-intimidating and half-welcoming meditation. Ursuta's works remind me somewhat of the art of Stephanie Cormier, who creates similarly almost-human sculptures. 


An installation view of Andra Ursuta's WhitesWhites, installation view

About the author

Dallas Jeffs Art Writer

Dallas Jeffs is the Editor of Artist Run Website's blog. She is a recent graduate of Emily Carr University of Art and Design, where she studied Critical and Cultural Practices. She is passionate about talking and writing about art, and sharing that interest with others. In her studio practice she is a painter, but she considers herself an art writer and educator foremost. If you like art, books and culture with a science fiction twist, check out Dallas' personal blog, HappySpaceNoises

Read more of Dallas' posts

Make your art portfolio easy

and focus your time on making art.


Try free for 30 days. No payment required.