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The Human Form in Action: Art by Edward Bock

An artwork featuring human-shaped cut outs in rusted acrylicConfluence #11422015, iron and copper oxide with acrylic on acrylic panel

Featured artist Edward Bock has built a practice around examining the human form in action. Working over a variety of media, the artist creates abstract and figural works, often depicting simplified figures in cohesive, choreographed groups.


A wall installation of human figures cut from an acrylic sheetFestival, acrylic on carved acrylic panel

I think Edward’s series of Rust Forms is a particularly good example of the way he captures movement in his work. These pieces are made on carved acrylic panels using a mixture of iron and copper oxide to create a rusted, metallic look. The combination of the metals - normally seen as a strong and rigid material – and the acrylic paint on overlapping forms creates an interesting contrast and a dynamic look.

A screen capture of Edward Bock's website


Also included in Edward’s portfolio is a series of abstract mixed media works made with acrylic, graphite and charcoal on canvas. These works combine a multitude of textures and aesthetics, with an interesting focus on negative space. Overlapping lines and geometric shapes give the impression of movement on a busy city street.


An abstract painting made with mixed media on a neutral backgroundAugust, acrylic, graphite and charcoal on canvas

About the author

Dallas Jeffs Art Writer

Dallas Jeffs is the Editor of Artist Run Website's blog. She is a recent graduate of Emily Carr University of Art and Design, where she studied Critical and Cultural Practices. She is passionate about talking and writing about art, and sharing that interest with others. In her studio practice she is a painter, but she considers herself an art writer and educator foremost. If you like art, books and culture with a science fiction twist, check out Dallas' personal blog, HappySpaceNoises

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