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Naive, Childlike Sculptures by Liz Craft


A tiled table with a three-dimensional pair of lips functioning as an ashtrayAshtray Table, ceramic tiles and steel

American sculptor Liz Craft creates figurative works that explore notions of cliché, counterculture and marginalized groups of people. Her naïve, childlike sculptures have a messy, accessible workmanship that upon closer inspection reveals conceptual depth.

 

A fibreglass sculpture of a woman lying on a couchNicole Couch (Pink, Fuschsia, Orange), fibreglass and paint

I enjoy the way that Craft’s sculptures seem to have a sense of humour about them. Her subject matter - combined with a deliberately imperfect execution - often appears silly at first, but upon closer examination expresses deeper aspects of human experience and psychology. Her overall body of work has featured many three-dimensional forms, roughly sculpted unicorns, skeletons and spiders. More recently Craft has been exploring tiled wall sculptures, combining a two-dimensional tiled surface with three-dimensional elements, such as body parts or bits of fabric rendered in plaster.  

 

Frequently employing materials such as fibre glass, ceramic, plaster and paint, Craft’s sculptures frequently look like they might be made of paper-mache, walking the line between fine art and craft. 

 

A bronze sculpture of a skeleton riding a motorcycle

Death Rider (Virgo), bronze


About the author

Dallas Jeffs Art Writer

Dallas Jeffs is the Editor of Artist Run Website's blog. She is a recent graduate of Emily Carr University of Art and Design, where she studied Critical and Cultural Practices. She is passionate about talking and writing about art, and sharing that interest with others. In her studio practice she is a painter, but she considers herself an art writer and educator foremost. If you like art, books and culture with a science fiction twist, check out Dallas' personal blog, HappySpaceNoises

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