Blog Menu

3 Ways to Add Something New to the Conversation


Photo of text framed on the wall

 

Have you ever seen a work of art that makes you think " Dang, I wish I had made that!" followed by the urge to actually create something similar? Don't sweat it, it's a common plight and totally normal. In fact it's great to celebrate the artists who make the work that you love such as the adoration blog by The Jealous Curator, an artist who posts about artists she's "jealous" of. You can check that blog out here. So how do you make sure that you are adding something new to the conversation of art and not just imitating another artist? I have put together these three pointers for you to consider.

 

1. Increasing the quantity of work you admire is important. Exposing yourself to tonnes of art and discovering multiple styles, trend and art-pieces is a great way to ensure that you won't simply be recreating  something in particular that you have seen. 

 

2. Use a similar technique but change the subject to something else. Maybe the subject could be changed to somthing personal, political or pop culture. If you love Degas' ballerinas and really want to try a similar style of painting you could 

 

3. Use the same subject but change the technique or materials significantly. In the photo below the artist took the famous image of the Mona Lisa but carved the image out of a leaf. 

 

Maple leaf with painting of mona lisa

Image source [1]

Image source [2]


About the author

Artist in residence Rebecca Chaperon

Rebecca Chaperon is our Artist-in-Residence

With a compulsion to create unique visual stories, her paintings often follow the thread of a heroine's misadventures through a surreal landscape.

She's had the pleasure of teaching at Langara College and given community workshops on painting techniques with an emphasis on watercolour, oil and acrylic. She is a board member at the Grunt gallery.

View her online portfolio
Website: thechaperon.ca

Read more of Rebecca's posts

Make your art portfolio easy

and focus your time on making art.

GET STARTED NOW

Try free for 30 days. No payment required.